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Health ConcernsThere are 939 products.

Subcategories

  • Acne

    Acne is a common skin disease characterized by pimples on the face, neck, back, chest and shoulders. It occurs when the pores of the skin become clogged with oil, dead skin cells and bacteria. Anyone can get acne, but it is common in teenagers and young adults, it usually starts during the teen years. This is because hormone changes make the skin oilier after puberty starts. Acne is not serious, but it can cause scars.

  • Allergies

    Allergies are hypersensitive immune responses to substances that either enter or come in contact with the body, such as pet dander, pollen, dust or certain foods. A substance that causes an allergic reaction is called an "allergen". Allergens can be found in food, drinks or the environment. Different reactions can lead to various symptoms including sneezing, difficult in breathing, vomiting, etc. 

  • Arthritis

    Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints. It can affect one joint or multiple joints. Arthritis symptoms include pain, joint inflammation, and swelling. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis, with different causes and treatment methods. Two of the most common types are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  • Athletes Foot

    Athlete's foot, known medically as tinea pedis, is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus. It is a fungal infection that usually begins between the toes and affects the upper layer of the skin of the foot. It commonly occurs in people whose feet have become very sweaty while confined within tight fitting shoes. Symptoms include a scaly rash that usually causes itching, stinging and burning. 

  • Bone Health

    Our bones support us and allow us to move. They protect our brain, heart, and other organs from injury. Our bones also store minerals such as calcium and phosphorous, which help keep our bones strong, and release them into the body when we need them for other uses. There are many things we can do to keep our bones healthy and strong. Eating foods rich in calcium and vitamin D, getting plenty of exercise, and having good health habits help keep our bones healthy.

  • Burns

    burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. First-degree burns damage only the outer layer of skin. Second-degree burns damage the outer layer and the layer underneath.

  • Candida

    Candida is a fungus, which is a form of yeast, and a very small amount of it lives in your mouth and intestines. Its main job? Helping out with digestion and nutrient absorption. But when overproduced, candida can break down the wall of the intestine and penetrate the bloodstream — releasing toxic by-products into your body and causing leaky gut. This can lead to many different health problems, from digestive issues to depression.

  • Cavities

    cavity is a hole that can grow bigger and deeper over time. Cavities are what you get from tooth decay -- damage to the tooth. Tooth decay can affect both the outer coating of a tooth (called enamel) and the inner layer (called dentin).

  • Cellulite

     The term cellulite refers to the dimpled appearance of the skin that some people have on their hips, thighs, and buttocks. Cellulite is much more common in women than in men because of differences in the way fat, muscle, and connective tissue are distributed in men's and women's skin. The lumpiness of cellulite is caused by fat deposits that push and distort the connective tissues beneath skin, leading to the characteristic changes in appearance of the skin. Cellulite has been medically referred to as edematous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy (EFP)

  • Cold / Cough

    The common cold, including chest cold and head cold, and seasonal flu are caused by viruses. Use over-the-counter cold medications to relieve symptoms including sore throat, runny nose, congestion, and coughFlusymptoms are similar, but include fever, headache and muscle soreness.

  • Colon Care

    Irritable or sensitive bowel, constipation and colitis are common colon problems, says the Cleveland Clinic. Colonic diverticula and polyps are also common problems individuals may experience with their colons. Constipation, defined as hard, small, difficult and infrequent stools, is probably the most common problem individuals may have with their colons. Another problem that may arise in the colon is colitis, adds the Cleveland Clinic. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, an urgent need to pass stool, and bleeding from the rectum.

  • Cold Sores

    A cold sore is a very small blister that is filled with fluid and is caused by a viral infection, according to Mayo Clinic. It is also known as a fever blister. Cold sores are known to appear in groups, and it is common for a crust to form over the blisters after they are broken. It is common for cold sores to go through multiple stages. The first symptom is tingling and itching, and then blisters usually appear near the boundary of the lips and skin, followed by oozing and crusting.

  • Constipation

    Constipation refers to difficult or infrequent bowel movements normally resulting from a disorder of bowel function, states WebMD. Affected individuals may experience straining during bowel movements, abdominal pain, hard stools or a sense of incomplete bowel movements. Although normal frequency of bowel movements varies widely from person to person, going three days without a bowel movement is unhealthy because the stools become harder and more difficult to pass.

  • Dandruff

    Dandruff is simply flakes of dead skin that form on the scalp. The official medical term for dandruff is “Pityriasis capitis,” and is often accompanied by itching, redness, and irritation. It’s normal for skin cells to die and flake off, so a small amount of flaking is normal and quite common, but some people experience an unusually large amount of flaking and need to take steps to reduce the problem.

  • Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash appears on the skin under a diaper. Diaper rash typically occurs in infants and children younger than 2 years, but the rash can also be seen in people who are incontinent or paralyzed. Almost every baby will get diaper rash at least once during the first 3 years of life, with the majority of these babies 9-12 months old. This is the time when the baby is still sitting most of the time and is also eating solid foods, which may change the acidity of the bowel movements.

  • Diarrhea

    Acute diarrhea is usually caused by a bacterial, viral, or parasitic infection. Chronic diarrhea is usually related to a functional disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome or an intestinal disease such as Crohn's disease. The most common causes of diarrhea include the following: Bacterial infections. Diarrhea can be defined absolutely or relatively. Absolute diarrhea is defined as more than five bowel movements a day or liquid stools. Relative diarrhea is defined as an increase in the number of bowel movements per day or an increase in the looseness of stools compared with an individual's usual bowel habit.

  • Digestion

    Every day, we eat food and the body carries out the process of digestion. Food is our body's fuel source. The nutrients in food give the body's cells the energy and other substances they need to operate, and digestion is the process of breaking down the food and drink into smaller molecules like carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and vitamins.

  • Dry, Itchy Scalp

    An itchy scalp, or scalp pruritus, is a common problem that can cause frustrating symptoms, such as frequent scratching and discomfort. Sometimes itchy scalp is accompanied by visible signs, such as scabbed or flaking skin. Other times, your scalp can itch without any skin changes. Dandruff is the most common culprit to blame for an itchy scalp. “The medical condition of dandruff is caused by an overgrowth of yeast.

  • Detox

    What exactly is a detox? Simply put, a detox is a process in which a person makes lifestyle changes to clear their body of toxins. These lifestyle changes typically involve abstaining from certain harmful things and optimizing body processes. Some changes are temporary, such as a following a cleansing diet, others are permanent. Toxins are any substance that can be poisonous or cause negative health effects. “Toxin” refers to all the metals, chemicals, pollutants, artificial food ingredients, pesticides, and poisons that cause the body harm

  • Diabetes

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases where the body’s pancreas does not produce enough insulin or does not properly respond to insulin produced, resulting in high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both impact glucose levels, and if left untreated, can cause many complications.

  • Dry Mouth

    Dry mouth, which is medically termed as “xerostomia”, implies a sensation of dryness in the oral cavity, especially on the tongue and roof of the mouth. Typically, it is caused by a reduction of saliva production, which might be stymied due to the salivary glands’ response to various kinds of stimuli. Apart from being discomforting for the suffering individual, dry mouth and lack of saliva is not good for the health; saliva helps in the digestive process as well as prevention of bacterial and fungal growth in the mouth. Therefore, treating this condition is important, and once the cause is determined, that is not difficult. Here are some common causes of dry mouth.

  • Dry Skin
    Dry skin is an uncomfortable condition marked by scaling, itching, and cracking. It can occur for a variety of reasons. You might have naturally dry skin. But even if your skin tends to be oily, you can develop dry skin from time to time. Dry skin can develop on any part of your body. It’s most likely to affect your hands, arms, and legs.
  • Earache

    People often make an immediate association between earache and ear infection. However, discomfort in and around the ear can be caused by many different problems. Most ear infections occur inside the ear. Usually there is no sign of infection on the outside. Redness, pain and swelling on the outside of the ear indicate a different type of infection.

  • Eczema

    Eczema is an itchy, red rash. It can appear all over the body. Many people have it on their elbows or behind their knees. Babies often have eczema on the face, especially the cheeks and chin. They can also have it on the scalp, trunk (chest and back), and outer arms and legs. Children and adults tend to have eczema on the neck, wrists, and ankles, and in areas that bend, like the inner elbow and knee. The rash of eczema is different for each person. It may even look different or affect different parts of your body from time to time. It can be mild, moderate, or severe. Generally, people with eczema suffer from dry, sensitive skin. Eczema is also known for its intense itch.

  • Erectile Dysfunction

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) means that you cannot get a proper erection. Most cases are due to narrowing of the arteries that take blood to the penis. This is due to a build-up of fatty deposits (atheroma) in these arteries in the same way that heart arteries are affected in people with heart disease. 

  • Gas

    Flatulence is a medical term for releasing gas from the digestive system through the anus. It's also commonly known as farting, passing wind, or having gas. It occurs when gas collects inside the digestive system, and is a normal process. But your gaseous patterns can actually speak volumes about your health, especially in regards to your eating habits, and they may even serve as an indication of larger digestive health issues.

  • Hair Loss

    Hair loss can affect just your scalp or your entire body. It can be the result of heredity, hormonal changes, medical conditions or medications. Anyone — men, women and children — can experience hair loss. Baldness typically refers to excessive hair loss from your scalp. Hereditary hair loss with age is the most common cause of baldness. Some people prefer to let their baldness run its course untreated and unhidden. Others may cover it up with hairstyles, makeup, hats or scarves. And still others choose one of the treatments available to prevent further hair loss and to restore growth.

  • Headache

    Headache is the symptom of pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck. It occurs in migraines, tension-type headaches, and cluster headaches. Frequent headaches can affect relationships and employment. There is also an increased risk of depression in those with severe headaches.

  • Heartburn

    Heartburn is a very common symptom created by acid reflux, a condition where some of the stomach contents (including stomach acid) are forced back up into the esophagus, creating a burning pain in the lower chest. The problem stems from a muscle that may be weak or may relax at inappropriate times. It’s called the lower esophageal sphincter or LES, and it’s located between your stomach and your esophagus. If it doesn't close quickly enough, it can’t prevent the acid backwash. That results in heartburn.

  • Heart Support

    The term "heart disease" is often used interchangeably with the term "cardiovascular disease." Cardiovascular disease generally refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke. Other heart conditions, such as those that affect your heart's muscle, valves or rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease. Many forms of heart disease can be prevented or treated with healthy lifestyle choices.

  • Hemorrhoids

    Hemorrhoids refer to a condition where the veins in the lower rectum and around the anus are swollen, dilated and inflamed (similar to varicose veins in legs). This can result in pain, itching, irritation, burning and sometimes bleeding – these symptoms indicate a flare-up. About 75% of all Americans will have hemorrhoids at some point in their lives. There are two types of hemorrhoids: internal and external. Internal hemorrhoids occur in the lower rectum and external hemorrhoids develop under the skin around the anus.

  • High Blood Pressure

    Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood. High blood pressure, sometimes called hypertension, happens when this force is too high. Health care workers check blood pressure readings the same way for children, teens, and adults. They use a gauge, stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. With this equipment, they measure. Normal blood pressure for adults is defined as a systolic pressure below 120 mmHg and a diastolic pressure below 80 mmHg. It is normal for blood pressures to change when you sleep, wake up, or are excited or nervous. When you are active, it is normal for your blood pressure to increase. However, once the activity stops, your blood pressure returns to your normal baseline range.

  • High Cholesterol

    Eating too many foods that contain high amounts of fat increases the level of LDL cholesterol in your blood. This is known as high cholesterol, also called hypercholesterolemia or hyperlipidemia. If levels of LDL cholesterol are too high, or levels of HDL cholesterol are too low, fatty deposits build up in your blood vessels. These deposits will make it difficult for enough blood to flow through your arteries. This could cause problems throughout your body, particularly in your heart and brain, or it could be fatal.

  • Immune System

    The immune system is a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by “foreign” invaders. These are primarily microbes—tiny organisms such as bacteria, parasites, and fungi that can cause infections. On the whole, your immune system does a remarkable job of defending you against disease-causing microorganisms. But sometimes it fails: A germ invades successfully and makes you sick.

  • Itching

    Itchy skin without a rash can be related to different conditions, such as hypothyroidism, an allergic reaction, liver disease, kidney problems, polycythemia vera, lymphoma and certain systemic disease, according to Merck Manual. Similarly, some drug medications can also cause itchy skin without a rash. However, a very common cause of this problem, which is also called pruritus, is dry skin.

  • Indigestion

    Indigestion is often a sign of an underlying problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, or gallbladder disease, rather than a condition of its own. Also called dyspepsia, it is defined as a persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen. Heartburn is when acid moves up from the stomach into the gullet (oesophagus) and causes a burning pain behind your breastbone. Indigestion and heartburn can occur together or on their own. It's a common problem that affects most people at some point. In most cases it's mild and only occurs occasionally.

  • Insomnia

    According to guidelines from a physician group, insomnia is difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. People with insomnia can feel dissatisfied with their sleep and usually experience one or more of the following symtoms: fatigue, low energy, difficulty concentrating, mood disturbances, and decreased performance in work or at school.

  • Joint Pain

    Joint pain can be caused by injury or disease of the joint or adjacent tissues. A joint is the area at which two bone ends meet to provide motion to a body part. A typical joint is composed of bones that are separated by cartilage that serves as cushioning pad for the adjacent bones. Ligaments attach bone to bone around the joint. Bursae are fluid-filled sacs that provide a gliding surface for adjacent tendons. Tendons attach muscle to bone around the joint. Injury or disease to any of the structures of the joint can lead to pain in the joint. Joint pain is also referred to as arthralgia.

  • Kidney Support

    Your kidneys filter extra water and wastes out of your blood and make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure so that your body can stay healthy. Kidney disease means that the kidneys are damaged and can't filter blood like they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in the body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health.

  • Liver Organ Support

    The liver is an organ about the size of a football that sits just under your rib cage on the right side of your abdomen. The liver is essential for digesting food and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the liver, such as viruses and alcohol use. Obesity is also associated with liver damage. Over time, damage to the liver results in scarring (cirrhosis), which can lead to liver failure, a life-threatening condition.

  • Menopause

    Menopause is defined as occurring 12 months after your last menstrual period and marks the end of menstrual cycles. Menopause can happen in your 40s or 50s, but the average age is 51 in the United States. Menopause is a natural biological process. Although it also ends fertility, you can stay healthy, vital and sexual. Some women feel relieved because they no longer need to worry about pregnancy. Even so, the physical symptoms, such as hot flashes, and emotional symptoms of menopause may disrupt your sleep, lower your energy or — for some women — trigger anxiety or feelings of sadness and loss.

  • Morning Sickness

    The medical term for morning sickness is "nausea and vomiting of pregnancy." Up to three quarters of pregnant women have at least some nausea or vomiting during the first trimester, and about half have only vomiting. The nausea usually starts around 6 weeks of pregnancy, but it can begin as early as 4 weeks. It tends to get worse over the next month or so.

  • Motion Sickness

    Motion Sickness is the feeling you get when the motion you sense with your inner ear is different from the motion you visualize. It is a common condition that occurs in some people who travel by car, train, airplane or boat. Many people suffer from this condition if they ride on a roller coaster or other similar amusement park rides. Motion sickness progresses from a feeling of uneasiness to sweating and/or dizziness. This is usually quickly followed by nausea and/or vomiting. 

  • Nail Fungus

    Nail fungus is a common condition that begins as a white or yellow spot under the tip of your fingernail or toenail. As the fungal infection goes deeper, nail fungus may cause your nail to discolor, thicken and crumble at the edge. It can affect several nails but usually not all of them.

  • Nasal Problems

    Sinus and nasal problems are caused by an inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose and sinus, creating a condition referred to as rhinosinusitis. It is one of the most common conditions in the United States affecting about 100 million people. Rhinitis refers to inflammation in the nose. Sinusitis refers to inflammation in the sinuses. Since the nose and sinuses are connected, the inflammation in one is commonly associated with inflammation in the other, hence the term rhinosinusitis.

  • Nausea

    Vomiting is an uncontrollable reflex that expels the contents of the stomach through the mouth. It is also called “being sick,” or “throwing up.” Nausea is a term that describes the feeling that you might vomit, but are not actually vomiting. Both nausea and vomiting are very common symptoms and can be caused by a wide range of factors. They occur in both children and adults, although they are probably most common in pregnant women and people undergoing cancer treatments.

  • Oily Skin

    Oils produced by the body help keep skin healthy, but there can be too much of a good thing. Excess oil can lead to blemishes and acne flare-ups. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to cut down on oiliness. Although the oil on our skin helps protect it and fight signs of aging, many people suffer from an excess of oil. We often picture teenagers having this problem, but it can affect people of all ages and cause blemishes, pimples, and other problems.

  • Parasites

    Organism obtaining nourishment from or living one another organism (the 'host') for survival and usually harming it and causing disease. Some parasites are independent and some depend entirely on their hosts and separate only when either one of them dies. Human parasites include bacteria, fungi, lice, viruses, and worms.

  • PMS

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) has a wide variety of symptoms, including mood swings, tender breasts, food cravings, fatigue, irritability and depression. It's estimated that as many as 3 of every 4 menstruating women have experienced some form of premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms tend to recur in a predictable pattern. But the physical and emotional changes you experience with premenstrual syndrome may vary from just slightly noticeable all the way to intense.

  • Prostate Enlarged

    The prostate gland secretes a fluid that helps to nourish sperm. The gland itself surrounds the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out through the tip of the penis. As the prostate grows larger, it may press on the urethra. This narrowing of the urethra can cause some men with prostate enlargement to have trouble with urination. Prostate enlargement may be the most common health problem in men older than 60 years of age.

  • Rash

    A rash is a skin condition that is marked by a change in the appearance of the skin. The change usually occurs as a different color and/or texture. Bumps, roughness, redness or blotchiness are common among many various rash types. In addition to a change in appearance, many rashes also cause discomfort or pain.

  • Respiratory

    The upper respiratory system includes the nose, mouth, sinuses, and throat. When you have an upper respiratory infection, you may feel uncomfortable, have a stuffy nose, and sound very congested. Other symptoms of an upper respiratory infection include: Facial pain or pressure, a runny or stuffy nose, which may lead to blockage of the nasal passages and cause you to breathe through your mouth, a sore throat, irritability, restlessness, poor appetite, and decreased activity level.

  • Fragile Skin

    Dermatologists define sensitive skin as very dry skin, which is prone to skin reactions such as pustules, skin bumps or skin erosion and has a tendency toward blushing and skin flushing. Excessively dry skin can no longer protect nerve endings, thus leading to sensitive skin reactions. In addition to dryness, some other causes of sensitive skin reactions are skin disorders or allergic skin reactions, such as eczema, rosacea or allergic contact dermatitis. Excessive exposure to environmental factors like sun and wind or excessive heat or cold can also cause sensitive skin to react. Underlying factors as well as genetics may cause your skin to have increased sensitivity.

  • Shingles

    Shingles is a painful skin rash . It is caused by the varicella zoster virus. Shingles usually appears in a band, a strip, or a small area on one side of the face or body. It is also called herpes zoster. Shingles is most common in older adults and people who have weak immune systems because of stress, injury, certain medicines, or other reasons. Most people who get shingles will get better and will not get it again. But it is possible to get shingles more than once.

  • Sore Throat

    A sore throat refers to pain, itchiness, or irritation of the throat. You may have difficulty swallowing food and liquids, and the pain may get worse when you try to swallow. Throat pain is the primary symptom of a sore throat. A sore throat can be the first sign of a cold, a side effect of strained vocal cords, or an indication of something more serious (like strep throat).

  • Snoring

    Snoring is caused by a narrowing of the upper airway during sleep. This can be due to large tonsils, a soft palate, a long uvula or excessive flabby tissue at the throat. All of these areas relax during sleep. In other cases, nasal congestion from allergies or deformities of the cartilage between the two sides of the nose can contribute to narrowing of the airway.

  • Stretch Mark

    Stretch marks are long, narrow streaks, stripes or lines that develop on the skin and which differ in hue from the surrounding skin. They are the result of a sudden stretching of the skin and are extremely common. Anyone can develop stretch marks, although they tend to affect more women than men. Stretch marks can be visible on body parts including the tummy, thighs, hips, breasts, upper arms, and lower back. The marks form in the middle layer of the skin; when there is a constant stretch, the layer tears, leaving stretch marks.

  • Stress

    Stress is your body's way of responding to any kind of demand or threat. When you feel threatened, your nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, which rouse the body for emergency action. Some stresses get you going and they are good for you - without any stress at all many say our lives would be boring and would probably feel pointless. 

  • Sunburn

    A sunburn is the skin’s response to extreme ultraviolet (UV) exposure and indicates severe damage. In as little as 10 minutes of intense UV exposure, the skin sets into motion a system of defense against this enemy. The first indication of damage is redness. This is the body’s inflammatory response in situations requiring repair and is a result of dilating blood vessels. The skin will then start to lose moisture and hydration, which will be apparent with a feeling of tightness. Slowly, skin cells will start to thicken and melanin (pigment) will be produced (tanning) in an attempt to stop the UV rays from penetrating through to the deeper layers and damaging the DNA of the cells.

  • Ulcers

    Peptic ulcer disease, commonly called ulcers, is very common and affects more than 4 million people each year in the U.S. Ulcers are sores or eroded areas that form in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (small bowel). Left untreated, ulcers can cause significant problems, including significant pain and severe bleeding. Fortunately, most people who develop ulcers can be easily treated.

  • Urinary Incontinence

    Urinary incontinence — the loss of bladder control — is a common and often embarrassing problem. The severity ranges from occasionally leaking urine when you cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that's so sudden and strong you don't get to a toilet in time.

  • Urinary Tract Infections

    Urinary tract infections typically occur when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. Although the urinary system is designed to keep out such microscopic invaders, these defenses sometimes fail. When that happens, bacteria may take hold and grow into a full-blown infection in the urinary tract.

  • Varicose Veins

    Varicose veins, also known as varicoses or varicosities, occur when your veins become enlarged, dilated, and overfilled with blood. Varicose veins are often painful and have a bluish-purple or red color. Often, varicose veins appear swollen and raised. The condition is very common, especially in women. Half of all Americans over the age of 50 have varicose veins. In most cases, varicose veins appear on the lower legs.

  • Warts

    Warts occur when the virus comes in contact with your skin and causes an infection. Warts are more likely to develop on broken skin, such as picked hangnails or areas nicked by shaving, because the virus is able to enter the top layer of skin through scratches or cuts.

  • Wrinkles

    Wrinkles are a natural part of the aging process. As people get older, their skin gets thinner, drier, and less elastic, and less able to protect itself from damage. This leads to wrinkles, creases, and lines on the skin. Environmental factors such as smoking can accelerate the development of wrinkles.

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